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Easy way to prevent theft


A local security firm has a foolproof solution that could help catch thieves.

Ryan Clarke demonstrating DNA technique.

Comprehensive Security Solutions, owned by Ryan Clarke, stands ready to play it’s part in identifying perpetrators with Forensic DNA property marking.

“It’s synthetic DNA that you use to mark property to prevent theft,” Clarke said. “You can also use it in especially in banks and jewellery stores. If someone is committing an offence you activate a control panel and it emits a slight spray when the person is leaving. Once it comes into contact with the skin it stays on up to six months so if it is that the police have an idea of who the person is they can do a swab of that person’s skin.

“Inside the liquid has a generic code and the code inside the bottle will match that on the person’s skin so it puts the person at the crime scene,” he explained.

Clarke’s challenge however, is to have a meeting with the police top brass to discuss the property marking.

“We don’t really want to go ahead without them and they’re the main hold up. We requested meetings with the Commissioner of Police but we were unable to get any. You can’t use something of that nature and the police don’t know how to look for it, it doesn’t make sense.

“The police don’t have to buy any new equipment; they will use their same basic forensic kit… It is not blood, it’s synthetic DNA [using] the same technique so there are no additional tools or equipment they have to buy. I heard from them in November and they said contact the office to set up a meeting. We’ve called and haven’t heard anything yet,” he explained.

On another note, Clarke said that the recession has taken a bite out of business as people they worked for before had scaled back or stopped using services such as mobile patrols.

One piece of the DNA equipment.

“A lot of people complain they don’t have any funds, both residential and commercial. Business is slow and one of the main challenges is that people want security services but they want it for free, so what you find now is that people instead of paying $10, they are persons coming and saying they will do it for $8.

“[My] question is the guy that’s taking $8, what is he paying his staff and that is why security is getting so much hassles in Barbados. If you pay the guys nothing, they will not want to work, if you pay me $4 or $5 a hour, I won’t feel like working although it can work both ways because you can pay a guy a whole heap of money and he doesn’t perform,” Clarke said. (DS)

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