News Feed

October 26, 2016 - Still hurting At one point Tuesday, Kenville Mayn ... +++ October 25, 2016 - Falling growth Government’s hopes of a near two ... +++ October 25, 2016 - Woeful Windies ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates  ... +++ October 25, 2016 - Warrens keep Deacons at bay It was a scare but Pan American Lif ... +++ October 25, 2016 - Flow Study help Students preparing for the Grade Si ... +++ October 25, 2016 - Police officer dies suddenly The Royal Barbados Police Force is ... +++

Rush to clear traffic tickets

Motorists wait outside the Police Traffic Department on Elletson Road, Kingston, to clear their outstanding traffic tickets, yesterday.

KINGSTON — Hundreds of motorists yesterday crowded the Police Traffic Department at Elletson Road, Kingston, to clear outstanding traffic tickets ahead of Monday’s expiration of the amnesty, which began in July.

The motorists, who came from across the island, stood for hours in long lines – some clearing as much as $70,000 worth of outstanding tickets dating back several years.

“One taxi operator came and cleared over 60 outstanding tickets, dating from as far back as 2009,” said one policeman, who was monitoring the day’s activities.

Yesterday, Senior Superintendent Radcliffe Lewis said he was encouraged by the turnout and warned motorists that they would face the full force of the law when the amnesty expires.

“This is true. The turnout was excellent, we are happy to see that motorists are adhering to the rules and guidelines,” SSP Lewis told the Jamaica Observer.

However, the day was not without hiccups as several motorists raised concerns that despite having paid some outstanding fines, a glitch in the computerised system resulted in them still being shown as delinquent.

“Dem really have to sort out dem system. This is foolishness! Imagine, I mek di sacrifice, starve miself to pay off outstanding tickets that mi husband had and dem system a claim that I still have outstanding tickets,” a fuming Joan Green said.

The frustrated woman then dashed out of the police station, her husband in tow.

“I have my receipts to show that I paid my tickets, so I don’t know what is happening,” said Lionel Green, as he tried to comfort his wife who was close to tears.

Omar Whyte had a similar story.

Glitch in the system

“I came and I cleared my outstanding tickets, but there seems to be a glitch in the system that needs to be addressed as police said they see my name coming up as still having outstanding tickets,” he shared.

For Clarence Golding, however, things went smoothly.

“Right now I not going to sit down and wait until the time pass, so that is why I am really here to take advantage of the opportunity,” said Golding, who travelled all the way from St Thomas.

Government started the amnesty on July 1 as it sought to collect billions owed in fines. The amnesty bars motorists from being arrested if they clear all outstanding tickets issued before September 21, 2010. (Observer)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *