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Passing drop test

So you work hard five or more days a week and have decided to treat yourself to a new Samsung Galaxy S III, or even a Note II. But you are a little surprised at the build quality, and materials used, so you guard it with your life from water, scratches and falls.

The one negative that can be said about these two handsets is the more than questionable finishes and materials used in their making. They sure don’t feel as sturdy or as expensive as their competitors, and this has had potential purchasers wondering how the plastic body would stand up to the rigours of daily life.

Well wonder no more, the manufacturer has started showing off the rigorous tests its smartphones go through in the labs while being prepped for over-protective users like yourselves. These experiments are engineered to see how sample and prototype devices perform when subjected to use and abuse — including having their buttons mashed thousands of times, being twisted, splashed with water, and tossed into a pot of corn to gauge scratch resistance. One test even plonks a fake, denim-clad posterior onto unsuspecting phones, attempting to bend them out of shape.

Sounds just about the average day at my house when it comes to phones abuse, but this just goes to show that despite how materials may feel in your hands you can be sure that they have been put through their paces and are ready for some level of day to day abuse — although some more than others (Nokia comes to mind right now). So though a case is an asset, you should have some level of confidence in the engineering behind your handset.

Although sometimes they may not be the most reliable or in fact very well based on day to day usage, there are tons of “Drop Test” videos on YouTube, you can also check that might help to ease your mind about the S III’s ability to bounce back (pun intended) from a drop.

Don’t get me wrong, you should always treat your device with care, but as it relates to the questions people have been asking about the S III, and its one drop death rumour, I would say to you it’s just that — a rumour, and though I personally don’t like the plastic feel it has (it feels cheap to me) I must say after closer inspection it is still a solidly made smartphone.

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