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Final push

Mitt Romney waves to supporters at a rally ahead of tomorrow’s election.

WASHINGTON — US presidential rivals Barack Obama and Mitt Romney face a final day of campaigning in a frantic fight for swing state votes.

Romney is due in Florida, where polls suggest he has the edge, Virginia, New Hampshire and Ohio.

Obama is later scheduled to appear in Madison, Wisconsin, accompanied by Bruce Springsteen, before going on to Iowa and Ohio.

Analysts say the election will come down to a handful of swing states.

Obama and Romney are running almost neck-and-neck in national polls, but surveys of many key battlegrounds show Obama narrowly ahead.

However, neither camp is exuding absolute confidence.

The campaign has been most intense in Ohio, which no Republican has ever lost without making it to the White House.

The pair spent Sunday addressing crowds across the country, with Romney speaking in Pennsylvania, a state his aides insist he can now win tomorrow.

Obama held rallies in New Hampshire and Florida and carried on to Ohio and Colorado in the evening.

In Florida, Democrats have filed a legal case demanding an extension of time available for early voting, citing unprecedented demand.

In Ohio, Republican election officials went to court today to defend an 11th-hour directive to local election officials.

Last month, a federal appeals court reinstated early voting on the last three days before election.

The ruling overturned a state law saying early voting should end on the Friday before the election, making an exception only for voters living overseas and for military personnel, who tend to favour Republican candidates.

Critics say this potentially favours the Obama camp. (BBC)

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