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Bahamian cops won't be armed 24/7

Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade.

NASSAU — As senior officials of the Police Staff Association press for all officers to be armed around-the-clock in the wake of an off-duty corporal being ambushed and shot six times, Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslade said yesterday that the matter is “not an issue”.

“That’s a done deal [and] we are moving on. There are many other things that we are looking at,” said Greenslade, referencing a private meeting recently held with PSA Executive Chairman Sergeant Darrell Weir.

“That’s not an issue. It’s not a road block and it is not something that we are negotiating – that’s not up for negotiation. The chairman spoke; I heard him, he spoke well. The commissioner has no particular issue with what he had to say.”

Support for officers

Greenslade, who was contacted for comment by The Nassau Guardian, acknowledged police officers are working in challenging and difficult circumstances, and said he will continue to do the best he can to support all police officers.

He added that he is proactive in dealing with issues like providing additional resources to better equip officers to perform their duties.

Wilfred Christopher Atherley, a corporal with more than 20 years of service on the Police Force, was ambushed and shot six times around 10:30 p.m. on October 6.

Initial reports indicate that the officer, who is in his 40s, was approached then shot by a masked gunman as he walked to his car.

Just days after the incident, Weir said the PSA would no longer “bury its head in the sand” while criminal activity threatens officers’ lives.

As it stands, many officers in the lower ranks have to turn in their weapons at the end of their shifts. (Nassau Guardian)

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