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Who to blame?

Health Minister Dr. Fuad Khan has said the drill was destroyed through an act of sabotage.

PORT OF SPAIN — Blame is flying in all directions following the death of Tobagonian Rahil Hosein who needed brain surgery which was never performed because there was no cranial drill at the Port of Spain General Hospital.

Hosein, 55, died on October 6 after he spent a week at Port of Spain General Hospital awaiting surgery for a brain tumour.

Health Minister Dr. Fuad Khan has said the drill was destroyed through an act of sabotage.

The Express yesterday spoke to several parties on why arrangements weren’t put in place for a drill to be acquired to perform the life saving surgery on Hosein.

Chief Executive Officer of the North West Regional Health Authority Judith Balliram-Ramoutar said an investigation was launched into Hosein’s death and she could not divulge details pertaining to his case.

She did confirm that an emergency purchase was made last Friday for a new drill and surgeries had re-commenced.

Balliram-Ramoutar said some 60 patients have been awaiting brain surgery as there was no drill in the past three months.

She blamed the failure to perform these surgeries sooner on the fact that the hospital’s house drill – the Midas Rex – went out of commission in March this year and drills rented from private companies kept breaking down.

Balliram-Ramoutar said there were attempts to fix the drill but the company did not respond in a timely basis.

Another drill was borrowed from the Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex and this was the drill that was allegedly sabotaged.

Balliram-Ramoutar said a tender (which takes four to six months) was conducted to acquire a new drill and a company was awarded the contract but that drill was not expected to arrive until the next two months.

Khan yesterday kept the blame on employees in the health sector who he said did not clean the drill properly, resulting in the loss of the $3 million piece of equipment.

“There was a new drill at Eric Williams, that drill is supposed to be cleaned by taking out the debris and tissue after surgery, they did not clean it properly, they put into an autoclave and it damaged the drill,” said Khan. (Express)

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