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175 years since consecration

Father George Harewood

A wonderful time was had by all as a host of members came out to celebrate the 175th anniversary of the consecration of the St. Stephen’s Anglican Church.

They dined, were entertained and partook in varied conversations at the luxurious Hilton hotel in Needham’s Point in St. Michael last Saturday evening.

Rector of the church, Father George Harewood, said that the celebrations were also used as an opportunity to honour the contributions of three of the church’s incumbents. All of them, he said, made some every distinguished contributions to the church.

They were: the late Reverend Gay Lisle Griffith Mandeville, who was the first Barbadian to be Bishop of Barbados from 1951 until 1960. Reverend Canon Basil Christopher Ullyett who was born on May 17, 1903 in Essex, England and died December 6, 2000 in Barbados and the Very Reverend Frank Bert Hamilton Harcourt Marshall, who is the current Dean of St. Michael’s Cathedral.

Last weekend’s dinner and award was just one of the activities held for the anniversary celebrations which began last December with a week of services, since it was back in December 8, 1835 when Bishop William Hart Coleridge consecrated the building. Earlier this year they held a tea party and celebrations would conclude with another a week of services in December.

Since its establishment, Father Harewood said, the church had played a major role in the development of Black Rock and St. Stephen’s but also to the country as a whole.

“Amidst the failures of the church there is always the work of God being done, it has provided school buildings for elementary, it has provided a ministry to the psychiatric hospital, the Lazaretto and the Nightingale children home.

“It would have helped persons especially out of slavery days- it provided them with an education. It would have shaped and fashioned the lives of the people by the preaching of the gospel.

“I would hardly be around for the 200th anniversary but we are hoping that the church will still be involved in the community and it would be in tuned to the times and its presence in the community that it serves would be lasting and would have the transforming effect that is its purpose in the world. We want to be able to do Christ’s work and the mission He has set,” he said. (KC)

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