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Embrace African heritage

Minister of Tourism Richard Sealy (centre) and tourism consultant Hugh Foster chatting with one of the participants.

Minister of Tourism, Richard Sealy, has dismissed arguments that a Black man’s nationality denies him an African identity.

Sealy issued this denial earlier today while delivering the feature address at the opening ceremony of the African Diaspora Heritage Trail Conference at the Lloyd Erskine Sandiford Centre, on Two Mile Hill.

Citing some of the words sung by the reggae artiste, Peter Tosh, which say: “Don’t care where you come from, as long as you are a black man, you are an Africa. No mind your nationality, you have got the identity of an African,” the St. Michael South Central MP maintained that no one should apologise for his/her identity.

The Acting Prime Minister said: “The significance of identifying with someone or something is the most basic of human instincts. Devoid of the capacity to rationalise its actions, the small child is able, from its earliest month to identify its digits, the objects in its immediate vicinity and its parents. This sense of identity continually widens and develops , gradually becoming deeper , and at the same time, more complex”.

The Minister of Tourism argued that in the same way the child seeks to know his heritage, “in many ways it is no different for persons in the Diaspora to seek to appease that longing to learn from whence we came.”

“We look for answers from a people that share the same rich legacy, the initial respite of manumission and gratification from delayed justice in the form of emancipation,” Sealy explained.

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