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Pausing on Tudor Street

Remembered with a kiss.

by Latoya Burnham

Gone but not forgotten. That message was clear today as Barbados remembered the lives of the six girls who perished in the Campus Trendz fire on Tudor Street, the City two years ago.

Today the site held a large poster of the faces of the six girls, and stuck between the doors of the still burnt out shell, well-wishers had placed flowers of various sizes and hues in their memory.

Nearby, as the clocks in the City struck the noon hour, workers and others in the City bowed their heads in front of the store to observe the minute of silence in their honour.

Workers from the nearby W.H. Brydens& Co. Ltd left their offices to stand in front the store at noon, an observance that Juliet Hall said was still important even today, two years later.

“We felt it and because we were working so close, we wanted today to remember their families and what they are going through and wish that their souls will rest in peace,” she said, flanked by some of the colleagues still there.

“I think it is very good that we can continue to remember them and their memories… I had just left the office to go home and when we heard about it we got back in a car and came back here,” she said recalling September 3, 2010, the fateful day.

Her colleague Perlene Jones also remembered that she would interact with the girls on going into the store, noting it was a good thing for the country to not forget the tragedy.

A young man, passing by, paused to kiss the image of Nikkita Belgrave, whom he said he grew up with and still remembers especially today. The man, who asked not to be identified, said his pain was still too fresh and each time he thought about what had been done to the girls, he experienced a new sense of anger and outrage.

Another man, passing by also said that he had paused in Cave Shepherd in the City to observe the moment of silence, adding that he was glad the island had chosen to remember the girls in such a public way.

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