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Class act

“I want to be like Sobers” – skit.

At the midway point of their global reunion, it was fair to say that the “Cawmerians” continued to humbly display their success stories, their talents and their Espris de Corps by design at a mid-week cultural and musical concert, held at the Boys and Girls High School, in Brooklyn.

During, intermission, Professor Allan Molnar, a music teacher of jazz at Leman’s College, who came to the concert in support of Kevin Moore – a member of the Waterford Music and Cultural Society, and one of his current students – when asked for a comment unhesitatingly said:

“Brilliant. I didn’t know what to expect, but I am glad I came. I was impressed by the sense of community, by the well created intersection of music influences and the resulting cultural meeting point that spanned decades of music, many different cultures, and age ranges.”

His point of view was shared in part, by at least, one other person.

When the orchestra played Ryan Blackman’s arrangement of Gabby’s Bridgetown Early, a male Bajan patron was spontaneous and loud, and with some disbelief said:

“No, that isn’t possible. Man dem sound just like the police band.”

Truth be told, the Master of Ceremonies, Kevin Hinds, was Combermere’s historian, a comedian at large and in control; Bajan accomplished actress Jennifer Walker posing as a bad-lady made laughter out of every possible kind of bag; the champion of stop the violence against females, TC, partied all day and kept awake all the “Kims” in an appreciative audience, while the Waterford Music and Cultural Society received a standing applause for their masterful musical journey as an orchestra, as actors, and as a back up band.

The stranger in the house closed the show in style.

When Big Ire

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