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Dollar drive for Darik

From left to right: Terry Phillips, Chairman of the DECS, Roger Husbands, Vice-Chairman Anthony Francis-Worrell.

Nineteen year old Darik Phillips is blind, cannot speak, cannot eat and is immobile.

Nevertheless his father, Terry, is optimistic that his condition can improve so he is seeking avenues to assist with his health. He has explored medical treatment in Cuba but first he must produce a medical report for the Cubans doctors.

The last medical report was done in 2008 and a new one is needed for the doctors to analyse his present condition to decide if anything could be done to improve it. The main problem Phillips is facing, he told Barbados TODAY is that he could not afford the $6,000- $8,000 required to pay for the relevant tests needed to complete the report.

The Drug Education and Counselling Services youth arm, Youth Empowered & Alive, will be hosting a dollar drive to aid in this venture.

This Saturday, August 25, from 11 a.m to 2 p.m close to 75 members, wearing white will go to Bridgetown to help raise funds for Darik’s medical support.

At their office on Bay Street St. Michael yesterday afternoon founder of the DECS, Roger Husbands, said YEA would give assistance to Darik because they believed they were called to assist young people.

On April 4, 2008 Darik, a normal active child, while preparing to participate in a football competition being held at the Banks playing field in Wildey, St. Michael had a massive asthma attack.

“He took the inhaler but he didn’t respond to it, then he reported it to the coach, they called me and because he was really bad they took to the hospital. By the time they got to the traffic lights in Collymore Rock his lungs had completely collapsed and by the time they reached the hospital his heart had stopped beating and he had a very faint pulse. They were able to revive him but the length of time he was without oxygen had resulted in permanent damage to certain part of his brain,” he said.

Darik spent three months in the Intensive Care Unit, three weeks on the ward and was released from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital on July 29, that same year. (KC)

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