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Majority of math teachers unqualified

KINGSTON – Education Minister Ronald Thwaites shocked guests at a scholarship awards function in Kingston yesterday when he announced that only 16 per cent of the island’s Mathematics teachers are qualified to teach the subject.

“That’s a reality that is now being presented to me. What we have to do is upgrade,” said Thwaites, who also told the JPS & Partners Co-operative Credit Union’s 2012 Awards Luncheon at the Knutsford Court Hotel in Kingston that competence in Mathematics was critical for all other technical and scientific fields.

He said the nation cannot afford to be sorry about the situation, but must work to upgrade Mathematics teachers in the system “and to make sure that more and more competencies are available in these areas”.

The minister’s revelation comes just days after the release of the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate examination results that showed a drop in both Mathematics and English Language scores.

Passes (students obtaining grades one to three) in CSEC Mathematics dropped from 33 per cent in 2011 to 31.7 per cent this year, prompting calls for an investigation into this year’s results. The pass rate in 2010 was 41 per cent.

The CSEC’s Subjects Awards Committee said it was “deeply concerned about the poor quality of work produced by candidates at this level” and called for regional action to address the deficiencies.

“Topics such as the range, perimeter, and profit and loss that should be covered at the lower secondary level were not fully understood,” the committee said in a statement.

One question in particular, which tested perimeter and area, saw 36 per cent of candidates scoring no marks, while 36 per cent scored no marks on another on Algebra, the committee noted.

It was reported a few years ago that a number of Math teachers had not passed the subject before entering college, but figures were never released about the few number of qualified Math teachers in the nation’s schools. (Observer)

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